Bacta

Bacta was a synthetic chemical substance that consisted of gelatinous, translucent red alazhi and kavam bacterial particles that were mixed within a colorless, viscous fluid known as ambori. When a patient was exposed to bacta, the bacterial particles within sought out wounds and promoted rapid tissue regeneration while preventing the emergence of scar tissue. Bacta was often thought of as a “miracle fluid”, and seemed to be effective against almost every type of injury and ailment across an incredible cross-section of species throughout the galaxy. It was considered to be the best medicine available anywhere, replacing the previously-used kolto.

Bacta could be administered through disposable bacta patches, through direct injection, consumption (via bactade), through the application of a salve or out of a Bio-Bacta tank, or by submersion in a standard bacta tank. When bacta immersion was used, the patient would either be clothed in white shorts or a white gown depending on the person’s gender. The method of administration depended on the severity of the wounds. It was imperative that bacta be applied in a solution of clear synthetic fluid which mimicked the body’s own vital fluids.
Bacta tanks came in two varieties: large tanks for installation in medical facilities, and portable collapsible tanks for emergency. Field tanks required patients to lie on their backs or stomachs while the bacta was run out and in again through filters. The taste and smell of bacta, described as ‘sickly-sweet’, stayed in the mouth and nasal cavity for weeks after immersion in a tank. The patch left a somewhat weaker-smelling residue.

Bacta

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